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Improving Outcomes for Patients With Gout: Updates on Diagnosis and Management

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Course Description

Gout is a chronic arthropathy caused by hyperuricemia, which is abnormally high uric acid levels in the blood that can lead to monosodium urate crystal deposition in tissues and joints. 1 The overall prevalence has been estimated at 4%or approximately 8.3 million Americansand may reach 12% to 13% in certain subpopulations. 2 Gout is expected to become more common, owing in part to an aging population and increased rates of comorbidities that predispose individuals to hyperuricemia (eg, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease). 3 Despite the availability of effective therapies, including inhibitors of the urate-producing enzyme xanthine oxidase, gout management is often inadequate. 3,4 Patients commonly suffer from short- and long-term disability, may develop permanent joint damage, and often land in the emergency room. 5,6 Moreover, a gout diagnosis has been independently linked to total and cardiovascular mortality, with higher risks observed with rising urate levels. 7 Thus, there is a significant need for greater clinician awareness of best practices for diagnosis as well as new agents that target various processes in urate homeostasis, such as uric acid reabsorption in the kidney. 4,8 During this enduring Interactive Exchange TM program, expert faculty will highlight the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of gout, with an emphasis on multimodal treatment regimens, urate-lowering therapies, and strategies for therapeutic tailoring. ________________________ References 1.Neogi T. Clinical practice. Gout. N Engl J Med . 2011;364(5):443-452. 2.Zhu Y, Pandya BJ, Choi HK. Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008. Arthritis Rheum . 2011;63(10):3136-3141. 3.Khanna D, Fitzgerald JD, Khanna PP, et al. 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 1: systematic nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapeutic approaches to hyperuricemia. Arthritis Care Res . 2012;64(10):1431-1446. 4.Doherty M, Jansen TL, Nuki G, et al. Gout: why is this curable disease so seldom cured? Ann Rheum Dis . 2012;71(11):1765-1770. 5.Garg R, Sayles HR, Yu F, et al. Gout-related health care utilization in US emergency departments, 2006 through 2008. Arthritis Care Res . 2013;65(4):571-577. 6.Wertheimer A, Morlock R, Becker MA. A revised estimate of the burden of illness of gout. Curr Ther Res Clin Exp . 2013;75:1-4. 7.Stack AG, Hanley A, Casserly LF, et al. Independent and conjoint associations of gout and hyperuricaemia with total and cardiovascular mortality. QJM . 2013;106(7):647-658. 8.Edwards NL, So A. Emerging therapies for gout. Rheum Dis Clin North Am . 2014;40(2):375-387.

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Learning Format 1 Hours
Self-Study

Credit Type(s)
Rheumatology Internal Medicine